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  Busline News August 2020
Click here for complete current print issue of Busline Magazine

By Rick Mullen,
Busline Magazine Associate Editor

The following import/export categories include motor buses, coaches, trolley buses and gyrobuses.

The U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, U.S. Census Bureau trade figures for May 2020 indicated vehicle imports were down in seven categories outlined, compared to May 2019. For the first five months of 2020, vehicles imports were also down in seven categories, compared to the first five months of 2019.

IMPORTS

8702103100 Public-Transport Type Passenger Motor Vehicles With Only Comp-Ign Internal Combustion Piston Engine (Diesel Or Semi-Diesel), Designed For Transport Of 16 Or More Persons, Incl

The United States imported 27 vehicles in May 2020, down 90 percent from 277 vehicles imported in May 2019. For the first five months of 2020, the United States imported 612 vehicles, down 43 percent from 1,080 vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

Canada sent 432 vehicles to the United States during the first five months of 2020, while Mexico shipped 125 vehicles.

The average price per vehicle for May 2020 was $256,900.67, down 15 percent from $301,868.75 for May 2019. The average price per vehicle for the first five months of 2020 was $300,776.84, down 9 percent from $330,117.04 for the first five months of 2019.

8702106100 Public-Transport Passenger Vehicles For Transport Of 10 Or More Persons With Only Comp-Ign Internal Combustion Piston Engine (Diesel Or Semi-Diesel), Other

The United States received no vehicles in May 2020, compared to 399 in May 2019. For the first five months of 2020, the United States imported 102 vehicles, down 88 percent from 878 vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

The United States imported 96 vehicles from Germany during the first five months of 2020.

The average price per vehicle in May 2019 was $37,730.11. The average price per vehicle for the first five months of 2020 was $61,099.37, up 49 percent from $40,887.56 for the first five months of 2019.

8702203100 Public-Transport Type Passenger Motor Vehicles With Comp-Ign Internal Combustion Piston Engine (Diesel Or Semi-Diesel), And Electric Motor Designed For Transport Of 16 Or More Persons

The United States imported nine vehicles in this category during May 2020, down 79 percent from 43 vehicles for May 2019. During the first five months of 2020, 89 vehicles were imported, down 45 percent from 161 vehicles for 2019.

All the vehicles were imported from Canada, during the first five months of 2020.

The average price per vehicle for May 2020 was $240,184, up 14 percent from $209,855.91 for May 2019. The average price for the first five months of 2020 was $248,900.88, up 7 percent from $233,250.90 for the first five months of 2019.

8702303100 Public-Transport Type Passenger Motor Vehicles With Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Piston Engine And Electric Motor For 16 Or More Persons

The United States imported one vehicle in this category during May 2020, at a price of $4,533, compared to no vehicles for May 2019. Four vehicles were imported during the first five months of 2020, up 50 percent from two vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

Canada sent three vehicles, while Mexico exported one vehicle.

The average price per vehicle for the first five months of 2020 was $167,341.75, compared to $15,200 for the first five months of 2019.

8702306100 Public-Transport Type Passenger Motor Vehicles With Both Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Piston Engine and Electric Motor for 10 to 15 Persons

The United States imported no vehicles in this category during May 2020 or May 2019. One vehicle was imported during the first five months of 2020 from the United Kingdom, at a price of $8,357.

8702403100 Public-Transport Type Passenger Motor Vehicles With Electric Motor Only, For Transport Of 16 Or More Persons Including Driver

The United States imported 19 vehicles during May 2020, down 39 percent from 31 vehicles for May 2019. During the first five months of 2020, 55 vehicles were received, down 77 percent from 244 vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

China shipped 30 vehicles during the first five months of 2020, while Canada sent 22 vehicles.

The average price per vehicle for May 2020 was $40,533.21, down 79 percent from $196,901.10 for May 2019. The average price for the first five months of 2020 was $48,122.85, down 55 percent from $107,964.28 for the first five months of 2019.

8702406100 Public-Transport Type Passenger Motor Vehicles, With Electric Motor Only For Propulsion, NESOI

The United States imported 19 vehicles during May 2020, down 30 percent from 27 vehicles for May 2019. During the first five months of 2020, 46 vehicles were imported, down 12 percent from 52 vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

China sent all of the vehicles during the first five months of 2020.

The average price per vehicle for May 2020 was $7,979.05, up 5 percent from $7,621.15 for May 2019. The average price per vehicle for the first five months of 2020 was $9,913.83, up 27 percent from $7,777.96 for the first five months of 2019.

8702903100 Public-Transport Type Passenger Motor Vehicles For 16 Or More Persons Including Driver, NESOI

The United States imported 80 vehicles during May 2020, down 28 percent from 111 vehicles for May 2019. During the first five months of 2020, 506 vehicles were received, down 3 percent from 519 vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

Canada sent 504 vehicles to the United States during the first five months of 2020.

The average price per vehicle for May 2020 was $91,552.70, up 34 percent from $68,081.26 for May 2019. The average price per vehicle for the first five months of 2020 was $105,504.22, up 68 percent from $62,674.70 for the first five months of 2019.

8702906100 Motor Vehicles For The Transport Of 10 To 15 Persons Including Driver, NESOI

The United States imported 19 vehicles during May 2020, down 87 percent from 144 vehicles for May 2019. During the first five months of 2020, 254 vehicles were received, down 52 percent from 534 vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

Canada sent 135 vehicles to the United States during the first five months of 2020, while Germany exported 105 vehicles.

The average price per vehicle for May 2020 was $39,743.95, up 5 percent from $37,772.92 for May 2019. The average price per vehicle for the first five months of 2020 was $46,318.01, up 8 percent from $43,070.64 for the first five months of 2019.

EXPORTS

Export totals for May 2020 were down in all four categories, compared to May 2019. For the first five months of 2020, two categories reported increases.

8702100002 Public-Transport Type Passenger Motor Vehicles With A Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Piston Engine (Diesel Or Semi-Diesel) Only

The United States exported 559 vehicles during May 2020, down 26 percent from 760 vehicles exported in May 2019. During the first five months of 2020, 2,618 vehicles were sent, down 6 percent from 2,790 vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

Canada received 1,295 vehicles during the first five months of 2020, while Mexico imported 960.

The average price per vehicle for May 2020 was $99,059.77, up 41 percent from $70,159.34 for May 2019. The average price per vehicle for the first five months of 2020 was $66,276.68, up less than 1 percent from $66,161.40 for the first five months of 2019.

8702200000 Public-Transport Vehicles With Both Compression-Ignition Internal Combustion Piston Engine (Diesel Or Semi-Diesel) & Electric Motor

The United States shipped no vehicles in May 2020, compared to 488 vehicles for May 2019. During the first five months of 2020, 181 vehicles were exported, down 90 percent from 1,815 vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

Canada received 91 vehicles during the first five months of 2020, while Nigeria imported 41 vehicles.

The average price per vehicle for May 2019 was $28,287.31. The average price for the first five months of 2020 was $45,949.45, up 63 percent from $28,131.08 for the first five months of 2019.

8702300000 Public-Transport Type Passenger Motor Vehicles With Both Spark Ignition Internal Combustion Piston Engine & Electric Motor

The United States exported 12 vehicles in May 2020, down 65 percent from 34 vehicles for May 2019. During the first five months of 2020, 275 vehicles were sent, up 104 percent from 135 vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

Mexico received 194 vehicles during the first five months 2020.

The average price per vehicle for May 2020 was $35,253.67, up 5 percent from the average price for May 2019 of $33,652.12. The average price for the first five months of 2020 was $32,502.19, up 4 percent from $31,132.93 for the first five months of 2019.

8702400000 Public-Transport Type Passenger Motor Vehicles With Only Electric Motor For Propulsion

The United States shipped 72 vehicles in May 2020, down 29 percent from 101 vehicles for May 2019. During the first five months of 2020, 1,358 vehicles were exported, compared to 182 vehicles for the first five months of 2019.

Canada received 1,340 vehicles during the first five months of 2020.

The average price per vehicle for May 2020 was $27,062.92, down 8 percent from the average price for May 2019 of $29,286.50. The average price per vehicle for the first five months of 2020 was $35,162.46, up 22 percent from $28,898.37 for the first five months of 2019.




Click on statistics to open .pdf file


Complete Coach Works Delivers 4 Rehabbed Buses To Santa Cruz Metro


Complete Coach Works (CCW) has made the final delivery of a four-bus purchase to Santa Cruz Metropolitan Transit District (Santa Cruz, CA). The contract, which calls for the rehabilitation of four buses, was awarded late last year.

The work on the first two buses included repowering them with new engines that are certified and fully equipped with emission components that meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resource Board emission standards. Additional work for all buses included installment of rebuilt transmissions, new driver seats, reupholstered and repainted passenger inserts, internal/external LED lighting, new electric cooling systems, and complete rebuild of suspensions and axles. The buses were then repainted and decaled to reflect Santa Cruz’s branding.

The rehabilitations are part of Santa Cruz’s mission to enrich the passenger experience by delivering customers’ comfort and safety in a cost-effective manner.

Aaron Timlick, regional sales manager at CCW, said, “It is very important that transit properties keep their buses reliable and in good condition for their passengers. We are appreciative that Santa Cruz has chosen CCW to be the company to help them maintain their high standard. We appreciate the trust and confidence Santa Cruz has placed in us. The buses will provide years of dependable service.”

Complete Coach Works (CCW) has over 30 years of service in the transportation industry. CCW provides a team of over 350.

For more information, visit completecoach.com.


Indian Trails Resumes Daily, Scheduled Bus Service Throughout Michigan And Beyond


Indian Trails, Inc., (based in Owosso, MI) will restart most of its daily scheduled bus service, which includes routes throughout Michigan, and into Chicago, Milwaukee and Duluth, along with reduced connections with the Greyhound and Amtrak national transportation networks.

“We’re grateful to be resuming this important service in our region,” said Indian Trails President Chad Cushman. “Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve faced the biggest economic challenge in the 110-year history of our family-owned company. It feels great to bring more employees back to work and watch part of our 74-bus fleet roll off the lots and back on the road again.”

One temporary exception to the restart will be Battle Creek, where Indian Trails’ buses normally connect with Amtrak. The trains are currently operating on a reduced schedule that does not allow for such connections, so Indian Trails will resume Battle Creek service when Amtrak does. However, Indian Trails and Amtrak still connect in Milwaukee.

Indian Trails suspended operation of its daily scheduled routes about four months ago, on March 21, for financial and safety reasons. Specifically, there was a steep decline in passenger demand as businesses and government authorities restricted non-essential travel due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and many bus terminals and travel centers closed. The other major factor was concern for the health of passengers, drivers, and staff as the coronavirus spread.

Now, the economic obstacle has at least been temporarily overcome with about $2.4 million in federal CARES Act funding through the Michigan Department of Transportation and the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (the same type of funding provided to local transit authorities, of which a small percentage was designated for intercity bus service). Basically, this will help subsidize losses on all contracted and subsidized routes throughout Michigan and Wisconsin for the remainder of 2020, and perhaps the early part of 2021 as ridership builds back up.

The Phase I resumption of service — representing about 25 percent of normal operations — will enable the company to bring a quarter of its 150-member staff back to work, joining a smaller number of staff who have been working during the pandemic.

At the same time, concerns about the health and safety of passengers and employees are being addressed with a comprehensive set of precautionary measures.

Protections for Passengers and Drivers

In order to minimize the chance of spreading the coronavirus on board its buses, Indian Trails is taking the following steps:
• Requiring passengers to wear face masks for the duration of their trips — “No Mask, No Ride.”
• Providing hand sanitizer on all buses.
• Limiting the number of passengers per bus.
• Asking passengers to occupy seats as far apart as possible.
• Ventilating buses with fresh air rather than air recirculated through the heating/cooling system.
• Providing transparent, protective barriers between drivers and passengers with the first row of seats blocked off.
• Cleaning and disinfecting buses after each run, with particular attention to high-touch areas such as handrails, arm rests, and restrooms.
• Spraying the entire interior of each bus with a general disinfectant for additional sanitization.
• Requiring daily temperature and symptom checks of all on-duty Indian Trails employees, and requiring the entire workforce to abide by a comprehensive COVID-19 Preparedness and Response Plan. Staff members must stay home if they feel sick.

In addition, Indian Trails has continued to run shuttles on contract with a couple of universities and essential employers, and looks to add to those with the restart of some additional contract shuttles to begin in the fall semester.

Indian Trails, Inc. — a family-owned, intercity motorcoach carrier for 110 years, operates one of the largest and newest fleets of deluxe motorcoaches in Michigan. Visit the company website at www.IndianTrails.com.


From BYD
BYD Continues Its Commitment To Fighting COVID Both In Its Buses and For General Public


BYD Offers Post-COVID Options For Its Coaches/Buses

“BYD recently strengthed its commitment to cleanliness and safety of transit drivers and riders, unveiling several post-COVID-19 options for its line of buses and coaches,” said the company.

The newly unveiled options include technologically superior driver barriers, innovative antimicrobial handrail coatings and protective Plexiglas dividers. The options will be available in buses built by members of the SMART Union, Local 105, at BYD’s American factory in Lancaster, CA.

BYD Donates Surgical Masks/Hand Sanitizer

BYD Care recently donated 100,000 single-use surgical child-sized and adult masks and hand sanitizer for students, teachers and others in Los Angeles Unified, the second-largest school district in the U.S.

“We are pleased to be able to give back to our community,” BYD President Stella Li said. “Our students and teachers need to be protected, and we are glad BYD Care is able to help.”

For more information, visit byd.com.


San Diego’s MTS Making Changes To Security Department’s Use Of Force Policy


MTS security officers are pictured handing out free face coverings to
transit riders at the Old Town Transit Center July 30, 2020.

The San Diego Metropolitan Transit System (MTS) is making changes to its security department’s Use Of Force policy. MTS staff briefed the board of directors on the changes at its July 30 meeting. The Use Of Force changes come as one of several reforms the transit agency is making to its security department.

“These reforms to the Use Of Force policy are another step in our effort to comprehensively restructure our approach to transit safety. We will continue working to ensure dignity and safety for our passengers,” said MTS Chair Nathan Fletcher.

The agency used many of the principles in the “8 Can’t Wait” campaign, and as a guideline for the policy changes. The updates also keep the Use Of Force policy in line with recent state laws to police reform. Officer training has already begun, and testing on the new policy will begin next week.

Significant updates include:
• Banning carotid restraints and choke holds, including the prohibition of using knee pressure on the neck, throat or head;
• Requiring use of force to be proportional to the seriousness of the subject’s offense;
• A duty to intervene if witnessing excessive force by another employee;
• Requiring de-escalation tactics when feasible (de-escalation training was previously provided, but now written into policy); and,
• Requiring a warning prior to use of force.

The policy changes will apply to 64 internal MTS Code Compliance Inspectors and 158 contracted security officers. In addition to the Use Of Force policy changes, MTS will also begin a fare diversion pilot program Sept. 1 to help riders caught without a fare, avoid court fees and criminal citation. The agency is also in the process of conducting a third-party audit of its security policies and procedures.


Working In Conjunction With San Bernardino County, CA
Victor Valley Transit Donates Van To Senior Center


Sandra Spouse (left) and Priscilla Benadom (right) of the Trona Community
Senior Center are pictured with a donated 2020 transit van from
Victor Valley Transit for their Specialized Transportation Program.

Over the past year, the residents of Trona, CA, have been hit hard. The July 2019 earthquakes caused significant damage to essential services, and with the COVID-19 pandemic closing more businesses, transportation for the residents is needed more than ever. Recently, Victor Valley Transit's CTSA Division, working in conjunction with San Bernardino County, donated a new 2020 Dodge Caravan, with wheelchair accessibility to the Trona Community Senior Center for its Specialized Transportation Program.

The program, funded by San Bernardino County Measure I funds, allows Trona residents, aged 60 years or older, as well as ADA disabled passengers, transportation to essential medical appointments, shopping, airport pick up and drop off, and to various locations throughout Southern California. On its maiden transport, a Trona resident was taken to Loma Linda Medical Center in San Bernardino for medical testing.

“Having a brand-new vehicle will allow the Trona Community Senior Center to have more flexibility in providing transportation options to the Trona community in a comfortable, reliable, and satisfactory fashion,” said Ashley Palmer, CTSA program manager for Victor Valley Transit.

The 5-passenger van also includes space for two wheelchairs with commercial side entry, manual loading ramp, Q’Straint tie-downs, roll out co-pilot seat, rear storage area, and a foldaway double seat.

On the technology side, the vehicle is equipped with an Ecolane Mobile Data Tablet and mount, allowing the driver to accept trips from any location.

As the program coordinator for the senior center for the past 15 years and local historian, Priscilla Benadom said the van could not have come at a better time, “I am so excited that we have a new vehicle for our transportation program. With the help of our volunteer drivers, we have logged thousands of miles on our vehicles, providing transportation to our senior citizens and disabled clients. Since two of our current vehicles have logged over 100,000 miles, the new vehicle makes it possible to provide reliable transportation for the coming years and expand our services to meet the needs of the community.”


CCRTA (Corpus Christi, TX) Donates More Than 30,000 Masks To Community First Responders


"B" Safe Campaign keynote speakers (L to R): CCFD Fire Chief Robert Rocha,
Nueces County Public Health Administrator Luis Wilmot, Corpus Christi Mayor Joe McComb,
CCRTA CEO Jorge Cruz-Aedo, and CCRTA Board of Directors Board Chair Eddie Martinez.

Corpus Christi (TX) Regional Transportation Authority (CCRTA) has donated more than 30,000 masks to community First Responders.

The donation is part of CCRTA’s “B” Safe Campaign, which is the organization’s initiative to reduce the spread and impact of COVID-19 in the community.




Coming in the Sep/Oct 2020
print issue of Busline
. . . . . . . . .

Vehicle Showcase:
Transit Buses/
Articulated Buses

Busline Buyers' Guide To
Bus Shelters/
Street Furniture

Busline Buyers' Guide To
Fare Collection Systems


For further information, rankinmag@
consolidated.net




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